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  1. #286
    Osmo R
    Guest

    Re: mobile network design, was Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    Miguel Cruz wrote:
    >
    > What does this mean? In both the US and Europe either party is free
    > to hang up the phone when they are tired of the conversation. What is
    > the relevance of who placed the call?


    It is when one considers the etiquette. In general it is the caller who
    has something to say and it is polite to listen what he has to say. Of
    course there is no law that says one cannot just hang up and in some
    cases one actually might have better things to do.

    Osmo




    See More: Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?




  2. #287
    Andy Pandy
    Guest

    Re: Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?


    "chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and prestwich tesco"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1gxcc0g.dryer1xlgqdgN%[email protected]
    > > which show codes (423) 76/77/78/79 are subject to this surcharge (so that
    > > would be cheaper than I quoted, 41-43ppm).
    > >
    > > > but oddly, the only call
    > > > I made from the landline was charged 16ppm last weekend. I'll try a
    > > > weekday call and see what the per minute charge is. I'd read elsewhere
    > > > that 18ppm was the BT charge, so maybe it's the same, at the moment.

    > >
    > > I guess if the number of your SIM doesn't start as above, then you'll pay
    > > the landline rate, although this would seem odd, I thought the numbers in
    > > that list included all mobiles (except for countries like US and Canada
    > > where the receiver pays).

    >
    > The number is 423 66 etc.- so that might explain it.


    Interesting. You could try the telediscount number for Liechenstein landlands,
    this would be 5ppm. Or the mobile one is 10ppm.

    --
    Andy





  3. #288
    Osmo R
    Guest

    Re: mobile network design, was Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    Miguel Cruz wrote:

    >
    > Doesn't matter - he's ahead of you way before 3750 minutes.
    >
    > At "6.9-8.9" (which I'll just call 7.9), he's paying less than you
    > after as little as than 10 minutes of calling per day. With each
    > additional minute of calling he pays less and less than you do.


    With 300 minutes a month it is better get here a plan that gives 500
    minutes at 17.80 a month. Also do no forget received calls. 10 minutes a
    day is pretty much. Average use here has been about 150 minutes a month
    though it has been increasing somewhat recently as prices dropped.

    Osmo



  4. #289
    Ivor Jones
    Guest

    Re: mobile network design, was Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?


    "Osmo R" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Joseph wrote:
    >
    >> Your reading comprehension is sorely lacking. Did you not see "the
    >> receiver pays and I will have a conversation as long as both parties
    >> are willing." That implies that the party who is paying for the call
    >> is not as you say "babbling" but is having a conversation for as long
    >> as is mutually agreed by both parties. You really do need to pay
    >> attention!

    >
    > The other party might be too polite to interrupt you.
    >
    > Osmo


    If something was costing me money and I didn't want to pay it, politeness
    wouldn't enter into it..!!

    Ivor





  5. #290
    Steven M. Scharf
    Guest

    Re: mobile network design, was Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?


    "John R. Levine" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >> If the US systems are so much better, why is it then that a
    > >> significantly larger portion of the world is now using GSM rather
    > >> than TDMA? It's not just UK and Europe.

    >
    > Aw, c'mon. GSM has nothing to do with who pays for the call.


    And of course GSM _is_ TDMA. The only reason that CDMA took hold in the U.S.
    is a) because CDMA is much more spectrally efficient, (U.S. has less
    spectrum available for mobile voice and data), and b) you can cover an
    equivalent area with far less cells, which is important in less densely
    populated areas.





  6. #291
    DevilsPGD
    Guest

    Re: Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    In message <[email protected]> S Viemeister
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Miguel Cruz wrote:
    >>
    >> Osmo R <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > If the U.S. system is so much better why do so few people have mobiles
    >> > in the U.S. and why do you still use pagers (here pagers have been
    >> > discontinued years ago)

    >>
    >> I do not know anyone in the US who has a pager or does not have a mobile
    >> phone. I think you are going on old information.
    >>

    >I know one or two people in the US who still have pagers - but they also
    >use mobiles.


    I carry both. My pager can do things that no phone on the market today
    can even dream of doing:

    1) Standby time measured in weeks or months.
    2) Run from a battery that I can pick up at any corner store for $2.
    3) Receive a signal virtually anywhere. That includes elevators,
    underground (basements, subbasements, etc), parkades, train tunnels,
    etc.
    4) Hardware cost under $50 without any contract/commitment/etc
    (Important because if I break it, lose it, whatever else, I don't care
    anywhere near as much as if I lose me $300 cell phone)

    And not only that, my pager is smaller then any cell phone on the
    market.

    --
    No Sprinkles. For every sprinkle I find, I shall kill you.
    -- Stewie



  7. #292
    John R. Levine
    Guest

    Re: Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    >> In the US I was paying about US$25/month (19 euro) for unlimited
    >> calls to local landlines and mobiles. As you can imagine, calling
    >> patterns in that environment are quite different - people stay on the
    >> phone for hours.

    >
    >Well one can hope the other party does not have a mobile.


    Depends when. A lot of US plans now offer either unlimited night and
    weekend minutes or a large enough number that it might as well be
    unlimited, e.g., I get 3500/mo. This works fine for me, since during
    the day I tend to be in the office with my landline at hand, and
    nights and weekends I'm more likely to be out.

    >Well in some sense it is true. If all your friends get mobile phones
    >you need to get one too.


    Finland seems to be kind of a special case, just about the only place
    I know where there are more mobiles than landlines. It sounds like
    the landline service wasn't so grat, and the telco decided (not
    altogether unreasonably) to make mobiles irresistable rather than
    investing in landlines.

    In the US, pretty much everyone had a phone by 1960. Other countries
    took a lot longer to catch up, and if they waited long enough, mobiles
    could be a good alternative. I gather that everyone in Hungary has a
    mobile, too, because it was faster to build a new mobile network after
    the communists left than to fix the decrepit fixed network.

    R's,
    John



  8. #293
    Miguel Cruz
    Guest

    Re: mobile network design, was Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    Osmo R <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Miguel Cruz wrote:
    >> Doesn't matter - he's ahead of you way before 3750 minutes.
    >>
    >> At "6.9-8.9" (which I'll just call 7.9), he's paying less than you
    >> after as little as than 10 minutes of calling per day. With each
    >> additional minute of calling he pays less and less than you do.

    >
    > With 300 minutes a month it is better get here a plan that gives 500
    > minutes at 17.80 a month. Also do no forget received calls. 10 minutes a
    > day is pretty much. Average use here has been about 150 minutes a month
    > though it has been increasing somewhat recently as prices dropped.


    Yet you continue to make arguments based on the reasoning that people in
    Finland don't talk on the phone very much, as if there's any reason for this
    other than the fact that phone calls there are so expensive.

    miguel
    --
    Hit The Road! Photos from 36 countries on 5 continents: http://travel.u.nu
    Latest photos: Queens Day in Amsterdam; the Grand Canyon; Amman, Jordan



  9. #294
    Miguel Cruz
    Guest

    Re: Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    Osmo R <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Miguel Cruz wrote:
    >> In the US I was paying about US$25/month (19 euro) for unlimited
    >> calls to local landlines and mobiles. As you can imagine, calling
    >> patterns in that environment are quite different - people stay on the
    >> phone for hours.

    >
    > Well one can hope the other party does not have a mobile.


    Normally they have both, and everyone knows which is which. However, even if
    they only have a mobile, the costs to use it are far lower than in Europe
    (due to the called-party-pays system) so they feel freer to talk longer.

    >> I think we can assume from this that people would prefer to spend
    >> more time on the phone and find more value in doing so, but in the
    >> high-cost European telecoms market they cannot afford to.

    >
    > I doubt that. If they wanted to stay much longer on phone they'd get
    > land lines.


    Unlimited local service is a very recent phenomenon in the few places in
    Europe where it exists, so there hasn't really been an alternative. Just bad
    vs worse.

    > Yes, that's an example of what lack of competition causes. Probably
    > they want to keep on with the existing customers by giving a message
    > that there is no return.
    >
    > In most cases landline just just a hassle. There is additional phone
    > number. One needs to have an answering machine or service for it, the
    > phones have poor phone directories etc. It is much simpler just to have
    > one phone even though it might in some cases cost more.


    I don't see how a bad landline system is justification for a bad mobile
    system, which seems to be your fundamental argument. Sure, that particular
    bad mobile system may have some advantages over that bad landline system but
    that doesn't mean it's better than a good mobile system.

    miguel
    --
    Hit The Road! Photos from 36 countries on 5 continents: http://travel.u.nu
    Latest photos: Queens Day in Amsterdam; the Grand Canyon; Amman, Jordan



  10. #295
    Miguel Cruz
    Guest

    Re: Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    John R. Levine <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In the US, pretty much everyone had a phone by 1960. Other countries
    > took a lot longer to catch up, and if they waited long enough, mobiles
    > could be a good alternative. I gather that everyone in Hungary has a
    > mobile, too, because it was faster to build a new mobile network after
    > the communists left than to fix the decrepit fixed network.


    This is the case in any number of underdeveloped nations. Mobile systems, as
    compared to landline systems, are cheap in terms of capital and expensive in
    terms of ongoing costs. So where there is not much money for long-term
    investment, or faith in long-term stability, it is more likely that
    investors will primarily fund development of mobile systems in order to
    realize short-term profits even though the overall costs to the country are
    greater.

    miguel
    --
    Hit The Road! Photos from 36 countries on 5 continents: http://travel.u.nu
    Latest photos: Queens Day in Amsterdam; the Grand Canyon; Amman, Jordan




  11. #296
    Jerome Zelinske
    Guest

    Re: Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    This also is not going to change. I will not place a call to a
    wireless phone if I will get charged extra. If they won't give me a
    land line number, then they won't hear from me.
    Here the caller only pays for the land line call he makes (basically he
    is making a land line call to a wireless service provider, and the
    provider is making a wireless call to the recipient,) and the wireless
    recipient pays for the wireless service he has signed up for.



  12. #297
    Jerome Zelinske
    Guest

    Re: mobile network design, was Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    The only way I know that I am calling a wireless phone is if it is to
    one of my friends or relatives. The cost to others of my call to them
    is the same as any other call to them, and dependent on which provider
    and plan they have chosen, and they are free to tell me not to call or
    hang up if they think the call is going too long, or just not answer
    when they see my caller id.



  13. #298
    Jerome Zelinske
    Guest

    Re: Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    They may just have to get the extended battery or talk while plugged in
    to the charger.



  14. #299
    Jerome Zelinske
    Guest

    Re: Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    I have Earthlink/Covad, but also have to keep my sbc land line for it
    to work. My phone bill is only $16 and although my Wife an I have
    wireless phones we still use the land line some and the kids use it
    more. For example, my Wife will not give her wireless number to her work.



  15. #300
    Jerome Zelinske
    Guest

    Re: mobile network design, was Advice for calling US Mobile Phone?

    It is very easy and fast for either the recipient or the caller to hang
    up anytime they want. If someone is timid or polite, then that is their
    own problem.



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