Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 54
  1. #31
    wkearney99
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opions please!)


    Hopefully anyone with this stupid an attitude would drop-dead long before
    help arrived.


    "Elmo P. Shagnasty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "SS" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > The construction angle is probably the most accurate, as many buildings

    and
    > > businesses are putting in passive cellular shields (which are legal,

    BTW).
    > > Basically a large metal mesh that disrupts radio signals

    >
    > OH NO! BUT WHAT IF I'M HAVING A HEART ATTACK AND I PULL OUT MY CELL
    > PHONE AND I CAN'T CALL FOR HELP, IT'S THE EVIL BUILDING OWNER'S FAULT!
    > WHAT IF...WHAT IF....WHAT IF...HOW DARE THEY INFRINGE ON MY
    > CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT TO MAKE A CELL PHONE CALL FOR ANY REASON AT ANY
    > TIME! THEY MUST PAY!
    >





    See More: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opions please!)




  2. #32
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opions please!)

    Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "John Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>>> are easily identified and discarded. What it boils down to is that the
    >>>> sender's ISP can almost always be identified,
    >>>
    >>> Quite often, that is an overly optimistic opinion.

    >>
    >> I meant in the context of individual messages like the post from
    >> "Kathleen Carmody", which was easily tracerouted to a server in
    >> Minneapolis, which generally agreed with her email address which
    >> pointed to Brooklyn Center, MN. There was not the slightest evidence
    >> of header forging in that post.

    >
    > Tell me my ISP, then.


    I was speaking primarily about email messages.
    You are not using your ISP's NNTP server. Your NNTP service:
    UseNetServer.com, is one of the independents who does not record
    the originating IP address. Although this practice is quite common for
    third party NNTP service, email messages always contain the
    originating IP.

    --
    John Richards






  3. #33
    Jim Seymour
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opions please!)

    In article <[email protected]>,
    tim <[email protected]> writes:
    [snip]
    > Don't forget, that cell phones can be "life-threatening" in certain
    > situations.


    Yeah, that's what they say, all right.

    > I have seen reports where several major hospitals are
    > testing cell jammers in the critical care areas because of the
    > danger of having an rf transmitter so close to some of the
    > sensitive electronic equipment.


    So they're going to put always-on broadband RF sources in areas where
    they want to prohibit RF sources, is that it?

    >
    > Many of us have had EKGs at one time or another. Remember how hard
    > the tech had to work to get each of the connections just so to pick
    > up that VERY SENSITIVE voltage from the muscles being read?


    No, I don't. They attached the wires, did their thing, detached the
    wires.

    [snip]
    >
    > Put up a sign and turn on the jammer.


    Uh huh. Btw: If the milliwatt-level RF energy from cell phones is so
    disruptive to medical equipment, please explain why hospital security
    staff operate multi-watt hand-held two-way radios in the same
    environment?

    Btw2: Do you know how much hospitals charge for in-room telephones?

    There are good and valid reasons to restrict the operation of cell
    phones in hospitals, but they're more along the lines of why their
    use should be restricted on aircraft, in theaters and restaurants,
    and in other venues where people are too damn stupid and
    inconsiderate to be allowed the freedom of their own judgement.

    --
    Jim Seymour | "There is no expedient to which a man will not
    [email protected] | go to avoid the labor of thinking."
    http://jimsun.LinxNet.com | - Thomas A. Edison



  4. #34
    O/Siris
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opionsplease!)

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > its not against the law. whether or not it should be or not is a different
    > subject, but as it stands, there are no laws saying you cant call yourself
    > whatever you want on the internet
    >
    > john travolta
    >


    Really? Call yourself a police officer.

    I think that, if anyone were to bother to investigate (and that's a
    significant if unless you actually use the claim to some end), you'd
    find there *are* limits.

    --
    R
    O/Siris
    -+-
    A thing moderately good
    is not so good as it ought to be.
    Moderation in temper is always a virtue,
    but moderation in principle is always a vice.
    +Thomas Paine, "The Rights of Man", 1792+



  5. #35
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opionsplease!)

    O/Siris wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >>its not against the law. whether or not it should be or not is a different
    >>subject, but as it stands, there are no laws saying you cant call yourself
    >>whatever you want on the internet
    >>
    >>john travolta
    >>

    >
    >
    > Really? Call yourself a police officer.
    >
    > I think that, if anyone were to bother to investigate (and that's a
    > significant if unless you actually use the claim to some end), you'd
    > find there *are* limits.
    >



    Of course there are limits, but you may use any alias name you want to
    identify yourself in any venue, including in person, so long as there's
    no intent to defraud. Doing so to only garner someone's misguided
    attention is not itself a fraudulent act within criminal statutes.
    (Visit any bar on ladies night for examples) So, if JV wants to
    identify himself as a police officer, then he may do so, so long as his
    use of the false identity causes no real harm to anyone, nor provides
    financial gain for himself or another. Now, one person's definition of
    "harm" may very well be different than someone else's, but that would be
    an issue for a court to decide, and the burden of proof would be
    plaintiff's onus.

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



  6. #36
    [email protected]_nospam.com
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opions please!)

    http://www.rcrnews.com/news.cms?newsId=23199

    FCC re-iterates cell-phone jammers are illegal
    Jun 28, 2005
    WASHINGTON-People who want to use cell-phone jammers to get rid of
    annoying mobile-phone use should think again.
    It is against the law. Those found using, selling, manufacturing or
    distributing cell-phone jammers could be subject to an $11,000-per-day
    fine and seizure of their equipment by the United States Marshals,
    warned the Federal Communications Commission.

    "In response to multiple inquiries concerning the sale and use of
    transmitters designed to prevent, jam or interfere with the operation
    of cellular and PCS telephones, the FCC is issuing this public notice
    to make clear that the marketing, sale or operation of this type of
    equipment is unlawful. Anyone involved with such activities may be
    subject to forfeitures, fines or even criminal prosecution," said the
    FCC.




  7. #37
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opions please!)

    Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "John Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Although this practice is quite common for
    >> third party NNTP service, email messages always contain the
    >> originating IP.

    >
    > Except when they don't.
    >
    > Maybe your head is in the sand. That's the only reason I can think of
    > you not knowing about spam...


    We covered this already. I'm a long-time spam fighter and know
    what I'm talking about. Services like SpamCop.net could not
    exist if the originating ISP were not uniquely determinable.

    --
    John Richards






  8. #38
    Steve Sobol
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opionsplease!)

    John Richards wrote:

    > We covered this already. I'm a long-time spam fighter and know
    > what I'm talking about. Services like SpamCop.net could not
    > exist if the originating ISP were not uniquely determinable.


    And there are enough anonymizing open proxies that spammers can abuse that
    often that's not possible. I've been doing the spamfighting thing since
    1996. I'd like to think I know what I'm talking about too.

    It's not impossible in all cases, just many.

    This discussion is way OT for the cellular newsgroups, so I'm not going to
    say any more...



    --
    JustThe.net - Steve Sobol / [email protected] / PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Coming to you from Southern California's High Desert, where the
    temperatures are as high as the gas prices! / 888.480.4NET (4638)

    "Life's like an hourglass glued to the table" --Anna Nalick, "Breathe"



  9. #39
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opions please!)

    Steve Sobol wrote:
    > John Richards wrote:
    >
    >> We covered this already. I'm a long-time spam fighter and know
    >> what I'm talking about. Services like SpamCop.net could not
    >> exist if the originating ISP were not uniquely determinable.

    >
    > And there are enough anonymizing open proxies that spammers can abuse that
    > often that's not possible. I've been doing the spamfighting thing since
    > 1996. I'd like to think I know what I'm talking about too.
    >
    > It's not impossible in all cases, just many.


    We've both had our say, and our viewpoints really aren't that far apart.
    As a long-time member of SpamCop.net I'd advise anyone who is
    serious about fighting spam or just wants to learn how to interpret
    headers to join that organization.

    > This discussion is way OT for the cellular newsgroups, so I'm not going to
    > say any more...


    Agreed. Over and out.

    --
    John Richards






  10. #40
    Linc Madison
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opions please!)

    In article <[email protected]>, someone purporting to
    be Kathleen Carmody <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > (-PLEASE- No lectures or legal suppositions needed or desired)
    >
    > Anyone know where to purchase a cellular phone jammer, preferably
    > stateside. There are vendors off shore, but none here in CONUS
    > that I know of. Please post here any US vendors that sell cellular
    > jammers. (Extra points for relating your experience with using one.)


    It's not a "supposition" or an "opion" -- cellphone jammers are illegal
    in the United States. Period. It is illegal to sell, buy, advertise, or
    operate a cellphone jammer in the United States. Period. See 47 USC
    302a and 47 CFR 2.803 for the details.

    If you operate a cellphone jammer, you are subject to fines of up to
    $11,000 per day under 47 CFR 1.80(b)(3). Whatever reasoning you think
    you have for ignoring those rules, I doubt the FCC or the judge would
    agree.

    If you have an area where you don't want people to use cellphones, the
    only legal way to do it is by constructing a cellphone blocker --
    essentially an enclosure with enough metal in the walls to absorb
    enough of the wavelengths used by cellphones to make them inoperable
    inside the enclosure. Google on the exact phrase "Faraday cage." Since
    a Faraday cage is a passive device that does not interfere with the
    operation of any equipment outside itself, it is not subject to the FCC
    licensing requirements. After all, it's just a metal box.

    If you're still intent on getting a cellphone jammer, I'll leave it to
    the judge to "lecture" you at your sentencing.

    --
    Linc Madison * San Francisco, California * [email protected]
    All U.S. and California anti-spam laws apply, incl. CA BPC 17538.45(c)
    This text constitutes actual notice as required in BPC 17538.45(f)(3).
    DO NOT SEND UNSOLICITED E-MAIL TO THIS ADDRESS. You have been warned.



  11. #41
    wkearney99
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opions please!)


    Uh folks, don't feed the troll.



    "Elmo P. Shagnasty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "John Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Although this practice is quite common for
    > > third party NNTP service, email messages always contain the
    > > originating IP.

    >
    > Except when they don't.
    >
    > Maybe your head is in the sand. That's the only reason I can think of
    > you not knowing about spam...
    >





  12. #42
    wkearney99
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opionsplease!)


    "Jer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Of course there are limits, but you may use any alias name you want to
    > identify yourself in any venue, including in person, so long as there's
    > no intent to defraud. Doing so to only garner someone's misguided
    > attention is not itself a fraudulent act within criminal statutes.
    > (Visit any bar on ladies night for examples) So, if JV wants to
    > identify himself as a police officer, then he may do so, so long as his
    > use of the false identity causes no real harm to anyone, nor provides
    > financial gain for himself or another. Now, one person's definition of
    > "harm" may very well be different than someone else's, but that would be
    > an issue for a court to decide, and the burden of proof would be
    > plaintiff's onus.


    In most (if not all) US jurisdictions impersonating an officer of the courts
    or a government official is most certainly illegal. While many job
    capacities don't have that sort of liability, government jobs like policemen
    certain DO. Granted, the likelihood of being prosecuted for doing it 'in a
    bar on ladies night' is not very high. But get caught stopping that same
    skirt out in the parking lot claiming to be Joe Friday and you'd be on well
    on your way to the lockup.

    None of this conflates to online identities, so please, make use of better
    analogies.




  13. #43
    DecTxCowboy
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opionsplease!)

    > And it would be immediately obvious to anyone using the debug
    > screen on a CDMA phone


    Well...that rules out 99.999999% of handset users.



  14. #44
    [email protected]_nospam.com
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opions please!)




  15. #45
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: Where to Buy a Cellular Phone Jammer (no lectures or legal opionsplease!)

    wkearney99 wrote:
    > "Jer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Of course there are limits, but you may use any alias name you want to
    >>identify yourself in any venue, including in person, so long as there's
    >>no intent to defraud. Doing so to only garner someone's misguided
    >>attention is not itself a fraudulent act within criminal statutes.
    >>(Visit any bar on ladies night for examples) So, if JV wants to
    >>identify himself as a police officer, then he may do so, so long as his
    >>use of the false identity causes no real harm to anyone, nor provides
    >>financial gain for himself or another. Now, one person's definition of
    >>"harm" may very well be different than someone else's, but that would be
    >>an issue for a court to decide, and the burden of proof would be
    >>plaintiff's onus.

    >
    >
    > In most (if not all) US jurisdictions impersonating an officer of the courts
    > or a government official is most certainly illegal. While many job
    > capacities don't have that sort of liability, government jobs like policemen
    > certain DO. Granted, the likelihood of being prosecuted for doing it 'in a
    > bar on ladies night' is not very high. But get caught stopping that same
    > skirt out in the parking lot claiming to be Joe Friday and you'd be on well
    > on your way to the lockup.
    >
    > None of this conflates to online identities, so please, make use of better
    > analogies.
    >


    There's nothing conflated with my analogy. One can identify oneself as
    a police officer without legal retribution (even if one is standing in a
    parking lot), but acting in a capacity of one (aka "stopping") at any
    location *is* deceitful, ergo fraudulent. The difference is...
    identifying oneself as a police officer v. acting in the capacity of a
    police officer. The former may get one laid while the latter may get
    one arrested. Intent is a key component in our criminal statutes, and
    last time I looked, getting laid even under the guise of being a police
    officer was not an criminal offense - the difference is one can get laid
    even if one doesn't identify oneself as a police officer, but one cannot
    legally act in the capacity of a police officer without actually being a
    police officer. You'd be amazed at the number of women that get this
    crap and never ask to see an ID.

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



  • Similar Threads




  • Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast