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  1. #1
    PrimeWoman
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    ***I.C.E.***
    Since the London bombings, an idea called "ICE" (In Case of Emergency) has received lots of media attention. ICE calls for cell phone users to designate an emergency contact (or next of kin) and program it into their mobile phone's directory under the name "ICE." Doing this makes it easy for emergency responders to use the phone to contact the appropriate person when the phone's owner is unable to do so. --PRO vs CON:The dilemma is that even though it's important to make it easy for emergency responders to use your phone to contact the person you want contacted when you are unable to do so, it's equally important to consider password-protecting your wireless device when not in use. If your device is lost or stolen, a password can help prevent unauthorized access to your data or use of your service. Unfortunately, a password will, of course, also prevent an emergency responder from accessing your ICE information. Follow these hints to get the best out of ICE:
    *Make sure the person whose name and number you are giving has agreed to be your ICE partner.
    *Make sure your ICE partner has a list of people they should contact on your behalf, including your place of work.
    *Make sure your ICE person's number is one that's easy to contact; for example, a home number could be useless in an emergency if the person works full time.
    *Make sure your ICE partner knows about any medical conditions that could affect your emergency treatment; for example, allergies or current medication.
    *Make sure if you are under 18, your ICE partner is a parent or guardian authorized to make decision on your behalf; for example, if you need a life or death operation.
    *Should your preferred contact be deaf, then prefix the number with ICETEXT.

    Darien-based Juke Systems has developed, and released commercially, ICE First, a software application for mobile phones that allows users to store medical, insurance and important contact information about themselves and up to 10 dependents on their phones. This information is easily retrievable by first responders and other emergency medical personnel. Although there are no mandatory fields to be filled out, some specific categories, like name, address, home and work phone, next of kin, emergency contacts, primary doctor, primary insurance, known allergies, medications, come standard with the application. Equally as important as letting first responders know that you have an allergy or are taking certain medicines is letting them know you do not. If info changes, it is just as simple to modify the information. Every few weeks ICE First prompts the user to confirm the information is up-to-date or to update it. People can purchase the product for $9.95 at icefirst.com, after which the application is automatically sent wirelessly to a cell phone. It can be installed without the person having to connect his or her phone to a computer. A step-by-step guide to using it is available on the Web site. An annual subscription fee of $4.95 gives users continued access to that site and any software updates.


    See More: I.C.E. (In Case of Emergency)
    Last edited by PrimeWoman; 03-25-2006 at 08:43 PM. Reason: removing words:"last week"




  2. #2
    esvanr
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    Re: I.C.E. (In Case of Emergency)

    Sorry, but I don't think this I.C.E. thing is that great of an idea. Let me tell you up front that I am a fire dept paramedic who deals with patient ID and pertinent information all the time.

    The problems I see with it are: 1.) There are too many cell phones out there with completely different operating procedures. To expect an average police officer or firefighter to extract the data out of someone's phone is unrealistic. As a paramedic, I am too busy treating the patient to be fooling with someone's cell phone. The issue of a locked phone is also valid. 2.) Not everyone carries a cell phone, especially elderly persons, who are usually our frequent customers. Most people DO carry a wallet or pocketbook, though. 3.) If someone becomes separated from their phone, how do you link that phone with a patient, especially when it is a muliple patient incident? A lost wallet with a photo ID card can easily be matched to a person. 4.) Important medical information, such as special conditions and medication allergies can be better compiled and executed through the Medic Alert system, with bracelets, pendants, and wallet cards.

    So, my suggestion is that people print their pertinent information on a card (water-resistant ink is best), and tape it to the back of their driver's license or official ID card. We always look for a patient's wallet/pocketbook for information on that person if they are incapacitated and there is nobody at the scene who can provide info on that person.



  3. #3
    PrimeWoman
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    Re: I.C.E. (In Case of Emergency)

    It's simply some information that's available for consideration, an option. Bt no means the ONLY option, but certainly a viable one. I know some people who don't always carry I.D. on them, but have their cell phone 99% of the time. At least you are aware of the system...could be of use one day, so don't discount it completely. Your points are valid as well, however, given the thrust of the electronic age, even the "average" responder is becoming more saavy by default. Heck, I attached a card to my mom's home phone with ICE (in large, bold letters) info. God Bless you for the work you have chosen to do. Smiles.



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