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    RickyOreira
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    IP68 vs IP67: Water-resistant doesn't mean waterproof


    ORIGINAL HERE

    IP rating
    The first thing you need to look for is a device's Ingress Protection Rating (or International Protection Rating), although it is more commonly referred to as an IP rating. Rating codes do not include hyphens or spaces, and consist of the letters IP followed by one or two digits. Two common ratings for consumer devices are IP67 and IP68. Read on to find out exactly what that means.

    So you see! to "endurance" (Pun intended) on this matter: was not hard actually!




    But What do IP67 and IP68 actually mean?

    Most modern smartphones have these certifications attached depending on how resistant they are to the elements; dust particles and water, but what do the ratings stand for?
    IP This stands for the International Protection marking, a standard drawn up by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

    Solid protection


    IP Code Protection Object size
    0 No protection N/A
    1 Protection from contact with any large surface of the body, such as the back of a hand, but no protection against deliberate contact with a body part, such as a finger Less than 50mm
    2 Protection from fingers or similar objects Less than 12.5mm
    3 Protection from tools, thick wires or similar objects Less than 2.5mm
    4 Protection from most wires, screws or similar objects Less than 1mm
    5 Partial protection from contact with harmful dust N/A
    6 Protection from contact with harmful dust N/A
    As an example, an electrical socket rated IP22 (typically the minimum requirement for electrical accessories designed for indoor use) is protected against insertion of fingers and won't be damaged by vertically dripping water. Since we are talking about our gadgets, however, you only need to pay attention to IP ratings above IP5X or IP6X (for resistance or protection from dust).

    Moisture protection


    IP Code Protection Test duration Usage
    0 No protection N/A N/A
    1 Protection against vertically dripping water 10 mins Light rain
    2 Protection against vertically dripping water when device is tilted at an angle up to 15 degrees 10 mins Light rain
    3 Protection against direct sprays of water when device is tilted at an angle up to 60 degrees 5 mins Rain and spraying
    4 Protection from sprays and splashing of water in all directions. 5 mins Rain, spraying and splashing
    5 Protection from low-pressure water projected from a nozzle with a 6.3mm diameter opening in any direction 3 mins from a distance of 3 meters Rain, splashing and direct contact with most kitchen/bathroom faucets
    6 Protection from water projected in powerful jets from a nozzle with a 12.5mm diameter opening in any direction 3 mins from a distance of 3 meters Rain, splashing, direct contact with kitchen/bathroom faucets, outdoor use in rough sea conditions
    7 Protected from immersion in water with a depth of up to 1 meter (or 3.3 feet) for up to 30 mins 30 mins Rain, splashing and accidental submersion
    8 Protected from immersion in water with a depth of more than 1 meter (manufacturer must specify exact depth) Varies Rain, splashing and accidental submersion

    Things to remember
    • Most resistance testing is performed in fresh water. Devices aren't guaranteed to hold up to salt water, unless specifically stated from the manufacturer.
    • While showering with IP-rated devices isn't recommended, the device won't break if you forget to take it off. The device could begin to leak and become damaged with continued exposure however, and water damage may not be covered under the warranty.
    • Unless otherwise specified, most tests are carried out at temperatures between 15 and 35 degrees Celsius (60 to 95 Fahrenheit). Higher temperatures in places like saunas, steam rooms and hot tubs could damage the device. For example, the Pebble has been tested to work within the temperature range of -10 to 60 degrees C (14 to 140 F).
    • For obvious reasons, leather watchbands are not water-resistant.
    • Make sure all flaps (such as those for charging ports) are closed before submerging your device.
    • Unless otherwise stated by the manufacturer, you should avoid pressing buttons on the device while it is underwater. This could allow water to enter into the casing and damage the device.
    • Make sure the device is completely dry before charging it.
    • Always refer to the manufacturer's website before taking a phone, smartwatch or fitness tracker in the shower or the pool.
    • AGM A8 & AGM X1 are IP 68; basically, the highest around.



    See More: IP68 vs IP67: Water-resistant doesn't mean waterproof




  2. #2
    spmobile
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    Re: IP68 vs IP67: Water-resistant doesn't mean waterproof

    cool....



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