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  1. #1
    xCx
    Guest
    Jimbo.... wrote:
    > what a cool idea 3G on 900Mhz..........
    >
    >


    When I was first taught about frequencies I was always told that the
    higher the frequency, the shorter distance it could travel, so for
    example, the old orange adverts that used to say they had twice as many
    masts as Vodfafone and O2, but they were 1800mhz, so surely they'd need
    twice as many?

    3G is on what, 2100? So they must need even more.

    This is, of course, if I'm not talking balony



    See More: Cool Idea ......




  2. #2
    Jimbo....
    Guest

    Re: Cool Idea ......


    > When I was first taught about frequencies I was always told that the
    > higher the frequency, the shorter distance it could travel, so for
    > example, the old orange adverts that used to say they had twice as many
    > masts as Vodfafone and O2, but they were 1800mhz, so surely they'd need
    > twice as many?


    very true 1800Mhz is piss ......

    >
    > 3G is on what, 2100? So they must need even more.
    >
    > This is, of course, if I'm not talking balony


    Ah but 3g on 900Mhz ... good idea........





  3. #3
    Mike
    Guest

    Re: Cool Idea ......

    On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 21:46:42 +0100, xCx <[email protected]> wrote:

    >When I was first taught about frequencies I was always told that the
    >higher the frequency, the shorter distance it could travel, ...


    >This is, of course, if I'm not talking balony


    That's more-or-less true at VHF and above, but not (necessarily) at
    lower frequencies. A signal at 15 MHz (say) in one of the short-wave
    broadcast bands can easily travel around the world whereas a signal at
    1.5 MHz in the medium-wave band won't. Although once you get right
    down to the low Khz frequencies, signals will again travel vast
    distances and are used to communicate with submerged submarines.

    I'm sure you wanted to know that :-)

    Mike.




  4. #4
    Brian A
    Guest

    Re: Cool Idea ......

    On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 23:25:31 +0100, Mike <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 21:46:42 +0100, xCx <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>When I was first taught about frequencies I was always told that the
    >>higher the frequency, the shorter distance it could travel, ...

    >
    >>This is, of course, if I'm not talking balony

    >
    >That's more-or-less true at VHF and above, but not (necessarily) at
    >lower frequencies. A signal at 15 MHz (say) in one of the short-wave
    >broadcast bands can easily travel around the world whereas a signal at
    >1.5 MHz in the medium-wave band won't. Although once you get right
    >down to the low Khz frequencies, signals will again travel vast
    >distances and are used to communicate with submerged submarines.
    >
    >I'm sure you wanted to know that :-)
    >
    >Mike.

    With the caveat, of course, that some frequencies will travel further
    due to skip via the ionosphere. In the early days of radio the short
    waves were given to amateur radio opertors because it was thought that
    they were useless due to the short ground wave travel. However, due to
    'skip' radio amateurs found that they could communicate over long
    distances.


    ---
    Remove 'no_spam_' from email address.
    ---



  5. #5
    Jimbo....
    Guest

    Re: Cool Idea ......


    > In the early days of radio the short
    > waves were given to amateur radio opertors because it was thought that
    > they were useless due to the short ground wave travel. However, due to
    > 'skip' radio amateurs found that they could communicate over long
    > distances.
    >


    then they gave them away to the FLs .........





  6. #6
    Jon
    Guest

    Re: Cool Idea ......

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > When I was first taught about frequencies I was always told that the
    > higher the frequency, the shorter distance it could travel, so for
    > example, the old orange adverts that used to say they had twice as many
    > masts as Vodfafone and O2, but they were 1800mhz, so surely they'd need
    > twice as many?


    6 times as many.
    --
    Regards
    Jon



  7. #7
    alexd
    Guest

    Re: Cool Idea ......

    On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 21:46:42 +0100, xCx wrote:

    > When I was first taught about frequencies I was always told that the
    > higher the frequency, the shorter distance it could travel, so for
    > example, the old orange adverts that used to say they had twice as many
    > masts as Vodfafone and O2, but they were 1800mhz, so surely they'd need
    > twice as many?


    It's not just about how far the signal propagates. In some cases [eg in
    towns and cities] you don't want a large cell size, as that would mean
    using a larger slice of the spectrum to service a given number of
    subscribers.

    --
    <http://ale.cx/> (AIM:troffasky) ([email protected])
    22:08:38 up 21:49, 2 users, load average: 0.30, 0.29, 0.22
    Convergence, n: The act of using separate DSL circuits for voice and data



  8. #8
    Jimbo....
    Guest

    Re: Cool Idea ......


    > That depends on many variables especially height, but with such a small
    > country
    > distance isn't a major factor for any UK GSM network, capacity is.
    >


    except in scotland .......





  9. #9
    Steve Terry
    Guest

    Re: Cool Idea ......


    "Jimbo...." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >> That depends on many variables especially height, but with such a small
    >> country distance isn't a major factor for any UK GSM network, capacity
    >> is.

    >
    > except in scotland .......

    Even 1800MHz BTS can cover the theoretical 25mile GSM limit
    if you stick it up high enough.

    I've used Orange UK in Calais, it's BTS back in Dover

    Steve Terry





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