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  1. #1
    Floyd
    Guest
    It's about time someone called them on this practice. Maybe some other
    states will join in if this effort is successful:
    __________________________________________________________
    Minnesota Says Sprint Duped Customers

    Sep 27, 3:59 PM (ET)

    By BRIAN BAKST

    ST. PAUL (AP) - Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson sued Sprint Nextel
    Corp. Thursday, accusing the wireless carrier of extending customers'
    contracts without their informed consent.

    Swanson said she had received hundreds of complaints from Minnesota
    residents, including some who said they were threatened with a $200
    cancellation fee for trying to get out of contracts they thought had
    expired.

    "The company has used hidden trip wires to trap unwary consumers into
    lengthy contracts simply because they made small changes in their plan,"
    Swanson said.

    She said Sprint, based in Reston, Va., with operational headquarters in
    Overland Park, Kan., violated state laws that require consumers receive
    enough information and give knowing consent before contract terms are
    altered. She said she did not coordinate her action with officials in other
    states.


    Some Sprint customers who accepted a "courtesy discount" were unwittingly
    agreeing to stay with the company longer, according to court papers. Others
    had contracts extended when they added more minutes to their plans, even
    though they received assurances the change wouldn't affect their contracts'
    length.

    Swanson said she is investigating complaints against other wireless
    companies, but she declined to say which. She decided to sue Sprint first
    because it was cited most often by angry constituents, she said.

    She is seeking restitution for victims and wants the court to penalize
    Sprint up to $25,000 per incident.

    Sprint spokesman John Taylor said company attorneys were reviewing the
    lawsuit and could not comment.

    "It is Sprint Nextel's policy to go over the contract with the customer so
    they understand all aspects of it" before it is agreed to "or before the
    customer initiated changes are made to their account," he said.

    Taylor said the company sends written confirmation of all account updates
    and allows customers who change their minds to opt out.

    Swanson announced her lawsuit, filed in Hennepin County District Court, at a
    state Capitol news conference where she was surrounded by people who felt
    duped by the company.

    Among them was certified financial planner David Peterson of Andover, who
    said he received a letter in July thanking him for extending his contract on
    four phones. When he called to question the action, he said he learned from
    a customer service agent that his contract was lengthened for apparently
    inquiring about a plan discount - something he denies took place.

    Peterson said he was able to reverse the charges, but only after he and his
    wife spent hours dealing with the company.

    "I was livid at the way they handled this. They've treated us extremely
    poorly," Peterson said. "I'd like to give their CEO a big swift boot in the
    patootie."

    ___________________________________________________________






    See More: Sprint sued for unapproved contract extensions




  2. #2
    Andy
    Guest

    Re: Sprint sued for unapproved contract extensions

    Please keep us up to date on this suit.


    --
    AL'S COMPUTERS
    "Floyd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It's about time someone called them on this practice. Maybe some other
    > states will join in if this effort is successful:
    > __________________________________________________________
    > Minnesota Says Sprint Duped Customers
    >
    > Sep 27, 3:59 PM (ET)
    >
    > By BRIAN BAKST
    >
    > ST. PAUL (AP) - Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson sued Sprint Nextel
    > Corp. Thursday, accusing the wireless carrier of extending customers'
    > contracts without their informed consent.
    >
    > Swanson said she had received hundreds of complaints from Minnesota
    > residents, including some who said they were threatened with a $200
    > cancellation fee for trying to get out of contracts they thought had
    > expired.
    >
    > "The company has used hidden trip wires to trap unwary consumers into
    > lengthy contracts simply because they made small changes in their plan,"
    > Swanson said.
    >
    > She said Sprint, based in Reston, Va., with operational headquarters in
    > Overland Park, Kan., violated state laws that require consumers receive
    > enough information and give knowing consent before contract terms are
    > altered. She said she did not coordinate her action with officials in

    other
    > states.
    >
    >
    > Some Sprint customers who accepted a "courtesy discount" were unwittingly
    > agreeing to stay with the company longer, according to court papers.

    Others
    > had contracts extended when they added more minutes to their plans, even
    > though they received assurances the change wouldn't affect their

    contracts'
    > length.
    >
    > Swanson said she is investigating complaints against other wireless
    > companies, but she declined to say which. She decided to sue Sprint first
    > because it was cited most often by angry constituents, she said.
    >
    > She is seeking restitution for victims and wants the court to penalize
    > Sprint up to $25,000 per incident.
    >
    > Sprint spokesman John Taylor said company attorneys were reviewing the
    > lawsuit and could not comment.
    >
    > "It is Sprint Nextel's policy to go over the contract with the customer so
    > they understand all aspects of it" before it is agreed to "or before the
    > customer initiated changes are made to their account," he said.
    >
    > Taylor said the company sends written confirmation of all account updates
    > and allows customers who change their minds to opt out.
    >
    > Swanson announced her lawsuit, filed in Hennepin County District Court, at

    a
    > state Capitol news conference where she was surrounded by people who felt
    > duped by the company.
    >
    > Among them was certified financial planner David Peterson of Andover, who
    > said he received a letter in July thanking him for extending his contract

    on
    > four phones. When he called to question the action, he said he learned

    from
    > a customer service agent that his contract was lengthened for apparently
    > inquiring about a plan discount - something he denies took place.
    >
    > Peterson said he was able to reverse the charges, but only after he and

    his
    > wife spent hours dealing with the company.
    >
    > "I was livid at the way they handled this. They've treated us extremely
    > poorly," Peterson said. "I'd like to give their CEO a big swift boot in

    the
    > patootie."
    >
    > ___________________________________________________________
    >
    >
    >






  3. #3

    Re: Sprint sued for unapproved contract extensions

    On Tue, 2 Oct 2007 04:15:43 -0400, "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Please keep us up to date on this suit.



    There were complaint about Sprint doing this over 4 years ago when I
    used Sprint. Seems the CSRs had quotas to meet. Apparently
    nothing has changed, but it's a known problem. Google
    groups and see.



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