Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Bill Kraski
    Guest
    (PeteCresswell) wrote:


    > A workaround just occurred to me: put in a second land line at my house
    > that has that number that I want to preserve, use that for all incoming
    > calls, and somehow connect them to whatever cell phone I'm using at the
    > moment - either by dialing out on our existing line or by some software
    > magic provided by the telco.


    I would imagine you could have the number ported to a landline. But it's
    the options (& cost thereof) that really need exploring.

    1) You can get the "bells & whistles", which would include voicemail (which
    I don't think will notify another number) or use call forwarding to your
    prepaid phone. or.

    2) Perhaps, some of the higher end answering machines could notify your cell
    of messages on the machine. I'm not sure of that, it's an option I've
    never explored. or,

    3) Have the landline number go to an answering service that would notify you
    on your cell when they have messages. or,

    4) Get an old pentium (or higher) with a voice/fax/modem. Install whichever
    OS you prefer & a voicemail program you like. There are choices for both
    Windows & linux. And at least one I tried about 9 years ago had the
    capability of notifying a pager, which should also work OK for a cellphone.

    The downside of several of these is that, during the calls to notify you or
    for you to retrieve messages, the line will be busy to those trying to
    reach you.

    And what is the tax ratio on the landline? It might still be almost as cost
    effective to keep your prepaid cell with voicemail. And, depending on your
    carrier, perhaps you can move down to a cheaper (less minutes) plan?

    Bill K



    See More: Landline + Prepaid?




  2. #2
    (PeteCresswell)
    Guest

    Landline + Prepaid?

    On my "regular" cell phone account, I'm paying about 25% taxes.

    I don't use that many minutes, but need the phone to service my customers.

    The only reason that I don't go to prepaid is presrvation of the number that
    I've had for over 10 years and which probably 1,500 people know and have in
    their phonebooks.

    Seems like technically I should be able to keep that number on a series of
    prepaid accounts, but the folks at my carrier seem reluctant...besides every
    time I'd sign up for a new prepaid card, the number would be a risk.

    A workaround just occurred to me: put in a second land line at my house that
    has that number that I want to preserve, use that for all incoming calls, and
    somehow connect them to whatever cell phone I'm using at the moment - either by
    dialing out on our existing line or by some software magic provided by the
    telco.

    Anybody familiar with a scheme like this?

    Is it practical?
    --
    PeteCresswell



  3. #3
    (PeteCresswell)
    Guest

    Re: Landline + Prepaid?

    Per Bill Kraski:
    >voicemail


    Any scheme that I'd adopt would have to include a realtime connection to my cell
    phone. I couldn't live with people getting bounced to voicemail all the time.

    Having to wait a few extra seconds while softward and/or hardware forwards the
    call would be acceptable - but 100% voicemail and/or paging would not.
    --
    PeteCresswell



  4. #4
    Bill Kraski
    Guest

    Re: Landline + Prepaid?

    (PeteCresswell) wrote:

    > Per Bill Kraski:
    >>voicemail

    >
    > Any scheme that I'd adopt would have to include a realtime connection to
    > my cell
    > phone. I couldn't live with people getting bounced to voicemail all the
    > time.
    >
    > Having to wait a few extra seconds while softward and/or hardware forwards
    > the call would be acceptable - but 100% voicemail and/or paging would not.


    OK. That pretty much means landline with at least some bells & whistles,
    plus less subsidized phone with limited noncontract minutes. So, you're
    looking at about $35-$40 a month (including taxes, etc.) for the landline.
    Up to $100 for a low end phone, plus a card that will vary in how often it
    will need to be refilled (depending on how often customers call, you call
    back & how long for each). Cingular GSM, for instance, can be had for $30
    up ($40 gets 450 minutes & rollover), plus a decent phone for up to $100.
    It seems like your alternative may cost you more in the long run than a
    contract phone would.

    Bill K



  5. #5
    (PeteCresswell)
    Guest

    Re: Landline + Prepaid?

    Per Joseph:
    >
    >Just use forwarding to deliver the calls to the number you want them
    >delivered to.


    Any idea what the user hears with "forwarding"? e.g. Does it just keep
    ringing transparently until the cellphone answers and hit the cellphone's
    voicemail if no answer, or is there an answer click followed by mysterious
    noises, followed by the cellphone ring?
    --
    PeteCresswell



  6. #6
    (PeteCresswell)
    Guest

    Re: Landline + Prepaid?

    Per Bill Kraski:
    >looking at about $35-$40 a month (including taxes, etc.) for the landline.
    >Up to $100 for a low end phone, plus a card that will vary in how often it
    >will need to be refilled (depending on how often customers call, you call
    >back & how long for each). Cingular GSM, for instance, can be had for $30
    >up ($40 gets 450 minutes & rollover), plus a decent phone for up to $100.
    >It seems like your alternative may cost you more in the long run than a
    >contract phone would.


    It's gonna depend on the nitty-gritty dollars and cents then. For instance, for
    some reason here in SE Penna we seem to have a better deal on land lines than
    most. My last data line cost me about $17/month - which would be the incoming
    line.

    Sounds like the deal breaker may be whatever the telco charges for forwarding
    those calls.

    Even if it were about the same, it might still be attractive to me because of
    the fungibility factor.... the ability to change carriers in a heartbeat with
    not even a minute when my number is not available to people one way or another.

    Gotta look into the forwarding charges.
    --
    PeteCresswell



  7. #7
    Bill Kraski
    Guest

    Re: Landline + Prepaid?

    (PeteCresswell) wrote:

    > It's gonna depend on the nitty-gritty dollars and cents then. For
    > instance, for some reason here in SE Penna we seem to have a better deal
    > on land lines than
    > most. My last data line cost me about $17/month - which would be the
    > incoming line.


    Well, that's about $12 cheaper (before taxes) than we get, here in
    Baltimore. By the time you add the basic "bells whistles" (including call
    forwarding) and fees & taxes, it's around $35. So, for what you need, a
    $30 or $40 cell contract with a decent phone is very competitive, here.
    That may not be as true where you are.

    > Sounds like the deal breaker may be whatever the telco charges for
    > forwarding those calls.


    That & look at you landline taxes & fees. It may be that both have similar
    percentages of taxes & fees.

    > Even if it were about the same, it might still be attractive to me because
    > of the fungibility factor.... the ability to change carriers in a
    > heartbeat with not even a minute when my number is not available to people
    > one way or another.


    One other thing to consider. By adding the extra step of going to a
    landline, any time that service is down (the local drunk hits a pole,
    hurricane Buford rips out the wires, etc.), you have something extra that
    makes your calling system not work as well. Something else you want to
    consider in your decision.

    Whatever you decide, I hope it works out the way you want it to.

    Bill K



  8. #8
    David L
    Guest

    Re: Landline + Prepaid?

    I just got busy call forwarding on my biz phone account to try, for
    about $3 a month. I selected to have calls forwarded to my cell. Calls
    just go right through, seamlessly (AFAIK) and cell phone starts
    ringing.

    Check out the services offered by your Local Telephone CO on their
    website.
    Like these products...

    http://www02.sbc.com/Products_Servic...-1-3-2,00.html
    "
    Forwarding Your Incoming Calls
    Busy Call Forwarding $2.75/month
    Forwards calls when your line is busy.
    Add to CartCall Forwarding $3.23/month
    Automatically forward calls to any number. Take the Tour
    Add to CartDelayed Call Forwarding $2.75/month
    Forwards calls after a designated number of rings.
    Add to CartRemote Access to Call Forwarding $0.95/month
    Dial in and direct calls to another number.
    Call to OrderSelect Call Forwarding $3.23/month
    Forwards selected calls when you want them."

    Then there's the fancy, third party integrated comunications suites...
    $8-15+/month

    http://www.ureach.com/home/overview.htm

    "uOrganize: Essential productivity tools for everyone that include
    web-based email, address book and calendar.

    * uMessage: Voice mail, email, and faxes in one mailbox! Industry
    leading unified messaging and access to messages over the web, phone,
    or wireless devices.

    * uConnect: A unified mailbox and find me / follow me service - total
    control and integration of your communications in a single powerful
    service.

    * u800: Be in control of your business - u800 service from uReach lets
    you direct your calls anywhere. Easy and affordable!

    * u800 Plus: uReach gives you unprecedented control over your 800
    number - you route it to wherever you are - whenever you want!

    * uFax: Cost effective web-based faxing solution - No hardware or
    dedicated fax line required - send and receive faxes from your PC.
    Totally private, completely reliable and convenient."

    An 800 number can be valuable for some business uses, since it is
    "yours" for life, as long as you pay. It can be given out to special
    customers if one wants to control who's incoming calls they pay for.

    You can choose to "point" an 800 number to any other phone number
    (takes some time though) and also change the company that bills you for
    the service. With local number portability the consumer has much more
    control over their number, but those local numbers are still
    geographically based, so you can't simply take it with you if you move
    out of the area. An 800 number works anywhere in he US and Canada. Of
    course the "owner" pays by the minute for all the incoming calls.

    Here's one 800 number provider that has been recommended. The best
    deals are no monthly fee and good per minute rate. Getting a "good"
    easy to remember number, or one similar to your local number are
    possibilities. Some 800 number service providers have bigger pools of
    new 800#'s. Some offer "vanity" and custom numbers for extra. I've
    found it's best to get a clean 866, 877 etc. number, which has not been
    used, since the owner is charged for wrong numbers or calls from
    previous expired directories and ads as well!
    A friend, (who I signed up for another 800# service), called one night,
    very excited... apparently he got a _bunch_ of wrong numbers, due to
    people calling in for a TV ad. The callers were dialing 800-xxx instead
    of 888-xxx. Hard to predict which numbers will be used for ad
    campaigns, and how callers may misread certain numbers. That's one
    reason why 24 hour customer support is useful, but he had to wait for
    the next day.


    http://www.callatn.com/

    "American Telecom Network smNEW LOWER RATE 4.9 NEW LOWER RATE
    Per Minute, State-to-State
    (in the continental U.S.)

    Long Distance and Toll Free Services

    No Monthly Fees or Minimums

    NOTE: Other Lower Rates, which have small monthly minimums or monthly
    fees are also available.
    Call 1-888-ITS-GREAT for details.

    LONG DISTANCE PLAN FEATURES:

    4.9 per minute
    Flat-rate, State-to-State (in the continental U.S.), 24 hours a day / 7
    days a week.
    6-second billing
    With an 18-second minimum. Not in full minutes like most other
    carriers.

    NO Monthly Minimums or Fees!

    Same great rate available for businesses!"


    Allthough not acceptible for the OP use, since it's a messaging type
    service and not direct connecting, one cheap method of keeping an
    incoming number, is to find a Phone Answering Machine with a "number
    transfer" feature. "Pager Call" may also work, but not quite as
    useful.

    How it works... a caller leaves a message and then the machine is
    programed to dial a number string, then leaves a recorded message. I
    have it call my cell phone and leave a fairly long recorded message,
    saying I have received a voice mail back at the shop. IF I pick up
    during the incoming alert message, then entering the machines remote
    access code, will begin message playback . Some phones can be send a
    page with "Pager Call" when a message is received. AFAIK, incoming
    pager notifications cannot be interupted to get access the machines
    mail box.
    Unlike using a basic pager to recieve notifications, a cell phones
    incoming text is stored until delivery to the handset. Skytel use to
    offer this kind of guaranteed delivery. a ceap prepaid Callplus cell
    phone have free incoming pages for $10 /90 days and might be a good
    choice over a "2-way" guaranteed page service, although carriers seem
    to have been shutting down numeric/pager only type gateways(?)
    replacing them with voice and web based gateways.
    Saves on cell minutes and interuptions too, since recorded messages can
    be limited to ~3 minutes incoming.

    Basically, I always know when a business message is left, for no
    monthly fee. I can get the message at my convenience.
    The answering machine cost about $180, 7+ years ago. Hope I can find
    another "Transfer Number" capable model when it breaks?

    For urgent contacts, I can still give out my cell number.
    Havng an 800# pointed to the office answering machine would allow a
    customer to only need one number.

    The good points, using call transfer from an answering machine.
    It's very cheap, no monthly fee to phone company. Just a upper model
    Panasonic or ATT answering machine. (Haven't seen too many lately with
    this feature).
    Don't have to give out my cell phone number, when I probably won't be
    able to answer it anyway.
    Can return calls quickly, since I've been alerted for each incoming
    message. No "calling in" to check for messages!

    Giving out an 800#, pointed to the biz answering machine, allows
    changing of any of the phone numbers (cell or biz) and still having a
    permanent number that can be used in advertising. Costs about 5-6
    cents/minute for incoming calls.
    With an 800#, there is also a list of all the incoming numbers that
    have called, with the bill.

    -
    David




  9. #9
    (PeteCresswell)
    Guest

    Re: Landline + Prepaid?

    Per David L:
    >I just got busy call forwarding on my biz phone account to try, for
    >about $3 a month. I selected to have calls forwarded to my cell. Calls
    >just go right through, seamlessly (AFAIK) and cell phone starts
    >ringing.


    Sounds good.


    - No per-forward charge, right? Just the monthly charge...

    - Whatever the type of landline account is, it probably burns a minute on that
    landline for every minute of forwarded time - just as if the landline made an
    outgoing call. ?
    --
    PeteCresswell



  10. #10
    David L
    Guest

    Re: Landline + Prepaid?

    Just a monthly fee of $2.75. I have an unlimited local phone plan and
    the cell number forwarded to is local. No per call charge or double
    airtime like a cellular call might be charged.

    Of course, I get more minutes used on my cellular bill, but i usually
    just call back from my landline, once I get offline if it's peak
    hours.
    Everyone should check out the special services the local phone company
    offers. Many are over priced frills, but some services are very useful
    and inexpensive for certain situations.
    SBC California Service Guide 1-800-21-GUIDE (1-800-214-8433)

    I refuse to pay for caller ID. That's just selling you back the
    information that was part of the incoming call info, which THEY block.
    It's like your ISP blocking headers and then charging you to see who
    the email was from! Since it's an unregulated charge, the local phone
    company can get away with charging you whatever they want to.
    I use a phone machine to screen calls, if I need, the phone machine to
    get messages and the same phone machine to notify my cell, when a
    message is left . (Call Transfer/Pager call). All for free on a 8 year
    old machine. Not the most sophisticated solution, but it works fine.




  11. #11
    GeekBoy
    Guest

    Re: Landline + Prepaid?


    "(PeteCresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On my "regular" cell phone account, I'm paying about 25% taxes.
    >
    > I don't use that many minutes, but need the phone to service my customers.
    >
    > The only reason that I don't go to prepaid is presrvation of the number
    > that
    > I've had for over 10 years and which probably 1,500 people know and have
    > in
    > their phonebooks.
    >
    > Seems like technically I should be able to keep that number on a series of
    > prepaid accounts, but the folks at my carrier seem reluctant...besides
    > every
    > time I'd sign up for a new prepaid card, the number would be a risk.
    >
    > A workaround just occurred to me: put in a second land line at my house
    > that
    > has that number that I want to preserve, use that for all incoming calls,
    > and
    > somehow connect them to whatever cell phone I'm using at the moment -
    > either by
    > dialing out on our existing line or by some software magic provided by the
    > telco.
    >
    > Anybody familiar with a scheme like this?
    >
    > Is it practical?



    Why not go with a unlimited pre-paid service provider?

    The coverage is not nationwide, but for $50 a month I get to gab on the
    phone all I want all over the US
    > --
    > PeteCresswell






  12. #12
    (PeteCresswell)
    Guest

    Re: Landline + Prepaid?

    Per GeekBoy:
    >Why not go with a unlimited pre-paid service provider?


    That's where I am now. tMob's 1,000 minutes for fifty dollars.

    I was looking for:

    1) Greater freedom in hopping between carriers without jeopardizing my phone
    number. With that scheme, all I'd have to is change the forwarding number
    when I changed carriers.

    2) Not paying 25% of my monthly bill in taxes. Seems like the government has
    found a cash cow here. But maybe if I do the arithmetic maybe I'll find it's a
    wash against the per-minute charges of prepaid.


    From the responses so far, it's not looking like a particularly realistic
    solution in terms of dollars and cents.

    Also, it's finally dawned on me that I would lose the benefit of incoming
    CallerID on the cell phone.
    --
    PeteCresswell



  • Similar Threads

    1. General Service Provider Forum
    2. alt.cellular.cingular
    3. alt.cellular.cingular
    4. alt.cellular.cingular
    5. alt.cellular.cingular