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  1. #1
    Kyler Laird
    Guest
    I bought a PCMCIA card from the SprintPCS store in Carmel, IN.
    The experience was good; the people were helpful and
    intelligent. (The Carmel store is *much* better than others.)

    I tested the card and *really* wanted to justify keeping it
    but the performance was insufficient for my needs. I returned
    it on the 14th day after purchase. The same salesperson
    handled the return and was quite pleasant and understanding.
    (She got the same card right before I did.)

    Thumbs up.

    --kyler

    P.S. I noticed that they had Cisco IP phones (7940?) in the
    store. I continue to hope that SprintPCS might offer a VoIP
    option.



    See More: SprintPCS card return experience




  2. #2
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS card return experience

    Kyler Laird wrote:

    > P.S. I noticed that they had Cisco IP phones (7940?) in the
    > store. I continue to hope that SprintPCS might offer a VoIP
    > option.


    Just curious, but what benefit do you see from Sprint offering VoIP over
    the existing network?

    I for one am a fan of VoIp and in fact fact one as my "landline" at home
    now. But doing VoIP over a circuit switched network seems to me the
    equivalent of getting traditional phone service, using it to dial up
    and ISP of 56K modem, and then hooking up Vonage to that connection...
    why not just use the first layer in that case?


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.




  3. #3
    Kyler Laird
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS card return experience

    Isaiah Beard <[email protected]> writes:

    >> P.S. I noticed that they had Cisco IP phones (7940?) in the
    >> store. I continue to hope that SprintPCS might offer a VoIP
    >> option.


    >Just curious, but what benefit do you see from Sprint offering VoIP over
    >the existing network?


    Control. There should also be a price drop.

    >I for one am a fan of VoIp and in fact fact one as my "landline" at home
    >now. But doing VoIP over a circuit switched network seems to me the
    >equivalent of getting traditional phone service, using it to dial up
    >and ISP of 56K modem, and then hooking up Vonage to that connection...


    I'm not suggesting that (although I recently tested such a configuration
    to see just how feasible it would be).

    >why not just use the first layer in that case?


    I'd like to do that. Ideally they'd just route the voice calls over
    IP to whatever server is specified.

    --kyler



  4. #4
    Stuart Friedman
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS card return experience

    VOIP over Sprint's wireless data network doesn't work. I tried out of
    curiosity, the connection is just not good enough. I think that the problem
    has as much to do with latency as it does with speed.

    I have done sucessful VOIP calls over POTS. My wife regularly works in the
    Middle East where international termination charges are very high and where
    broadband in the hotel room is not yet the norm (though it is being rolled
    out there somewhat as we speak). We talk over Skype when she is connected
    to a 56k dialup and it does work. This is particularly true in Kuwait where
    the dial connections seem to be particularly good.

    I would never run a business behind a 56k VOIP line and I would never use it
    as my main phone line, but with the appropriate codec and some patience, you
    can do a dialup VOIP call to a friend or family member on a dialup
    connection.

    Stu



    "Kyler Laird" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Isaiah Beard <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >>> P.S. I noticed that they had Cisco IP phones (7940?) in the
    >>> store. I continue to hope that SprintPCS might offer a VoIP
    >>> option.

    >
    >>Just curious, but what benefit do you see from Sprint offering VoIP over
    >>the existing network?

    >
    > Control. There should also be a price drop.
    >
    >>I for one am a fan of VoIp and in fact fact one as my "landline" at home
    >>now. But doing VoIP over a circuit switched network seems to me the
    >>equivalent of getting traditional phone service, using it to dial up
    >>and ISP of 56K modem, and then hooking up Vonage to that connection...

    >
    > I'm not suggesting that (although I recently tested such a configuration
    > to see just how feasible it would be).
    >
    >>why not just use the first layer in that case?

    >
    > I'd like to do that. Ideally they'd just route the voice calls over
    > IP to whatever server is specified.
    >
    > --kyler






  5. #5
    Kyler Laird
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS card return experience

    "Stuart Friedman" <[email protected]> writes:

    >VOIP over Sprint's wireless data network doesn't work. I tried out of
    >curiosity, the connection is just not good enough. I think that the problem
    >has as much to do with latency as it does with speed.


    It has everything to do with latency. It *does* (or at least can) work.
    The incoming stream was clear for me even using ulaw (64Kbps) compression.
    I couldn't get a GSM stream to go through reasonably though. Others have
    has success with iLBC.

    Using a jitter buffer probably would have solved my problem but I didn't
    have much time to play with it before I had to decide to return the card.

    Don't let this distract though; I'd much rather use Sprint's voice network
    to do voice (at this time, at least). I just want VoIP termination and
    the elimination of all of the PSTN charges.

    --kyler



  6. #6
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS card return experience

    Kyler Laird wrote:
    > Isaiah Beard <[email protected]> writes:


    >
    >>Just curious, but what benefit do you see from Sprint offering VoIP over
    >>the existing network?

    >
    >
    > Control.


    Control of what?

    > There should also be a price drop.


    How? The FCC has and will continue to regulate wireless, and the states
    will continue to impose taxes on the industry. Even the recent FCC
    decision that labels VoIP providers as "content providers" and free from
    state regulation only applies to "nomadic" services (Vonage, Packet8,
    Skype) and not to companies that provide an established infrastructure,
    like cable TV, landline and wireless phone companies. Packet or
    circuit, these providers are still subject to the old tariff model if
    the states see fit to continue that form of regulation (and indications
    are that they do).


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.




  7. #7
    Kyler Laird
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS card return experience

    Isaiah Beard <[email protected]> writes:

    >>>Just curious, but what benefit do you see from Sprint offering VoIP over
    >>>the existing network?


    >> Control.


    >Control of what?


    voice calls

    >> There should also be a price drop.


    >How?


    My bill is full of charges for access to the PSTN. You think they
    should still charge for PSTN access if they're not providing it?!

    --kyler



  8. #8
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS card return experience

    Kyler Laird wrote:
    > Isaiah Beard <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >
    >>>>Just curious, but what benefit do you see from Sprint offering VoIP over
    >>>>the existing network?

    >
    >
    >>>Control.

    >>Control of what?

    > voice calls


    Are you being purposefully obtuse, or do you simply not know what you're
    talking about?

    Let me be specific. Assuming Sprint rolls out VoIP, how will a user see
    a benefit in terms of "control" of voice calls?

    >
    >>>There should also be a price drop.


    >>How?

    >
    > My bill is full of charges for access to the PSTN. You think they
    > should still charge for PSTN access if they're not providing it?!


    No, but they can charge a VoIP access tariff. SBC is way ahead of you:

    http://informationweek.networkingpip.../news/53700323

    Also, the FCC's regulations defining VoIP providers as "information
    providers" and not PSTN carriers apply only to "nomadic" services, such
    as Vonage, Packet8 and Skype. Companies that also deploy and bundle
    their service with infrastructure, such as cable phone and wireless
    providers are still subject to traditional tariffs and state regulation.
    So, Sprint rolling out VoIP won't help you there, either.



    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.




  9. #9
    Kyler Laird
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS card return experience

    Isaiah Beard <[email protected]> writes:

    >Are you being purposefully obtuse, or do you simply not know what you're
    >talking about?


    I'm purposefully saying exactly what I mean. I hope I'm at least doing
    a better job of responding to what I quote than you are. If not, please
    make corrections.

    >Let me be specific. Assuming Sprint rolls out VoIP, how will a user see
    >a benefit in terms of "control" of voice calls?


    I don't know. That's the point. The user will get to decide what
    happens with the calls. Letting the user define his own benefits is a
    big part of what I call "control".

    >>>>There should also be a price drop.


    >>>How?

    >>
    >> My bill is full of charges for access to the PSTN. You think they
    >> should still charge for PSTN access if they're not providing it?!


    >No, but they can charge a VoIP access tariff.


    They who? The gov't? They're going to start charging a tax based on
    content of IP? It could happen but I wouldn't bet on it.

    >SBC is way ahead of you:


    Think so? What's the relationship? Does SBC's tariff have anything
    to do with SprintPCS service?

    --kyler



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