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  1. #1
    FirstHit
    Guest
    After seven years of using my Qualcomm QCP-2700 phone, I am going to
    have to buy a new phone. My battery is dying.

    I have tried out a number of phones at the Sprint Store. From these
    phones I call home and leave a message on my answering machine. While
    I'm there, I also call from my present QCP-2700. In every case, I find
    when I get home that my words are much clearer coming from my old 1998
    phone.

    What gives? I would think that with advances in technology that the
    newer phones would be better. Not so! I hate to give up my old
    clunker if I have to give up the quality I'm getting now.

    Your comments would be appreciated.

    FirstHit




    See More: Phone Sound Quality Declining




  2. #2
    Daniel W. Rouse Jr.
    Guest

    Re: Phone Sound Quality Declining

    "FirstHit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > After seven years of using my Qualcomm QCP-2700 phone, I am going to
    > have to buy a new phone. My battery is dying.
    >
    > I have tried out a number of phones at the Sprint Store. From these
    > phones I call home and leave a message on my answering machine. While
    > I'm there, I also call from my present QCP-2700. In every case, I find
    > when I get home that my words are much clearer coming from my old 1998
    > phone.
    >
    > What gives? I would think that with advances in technology that the
    > newer phones would be better. Not so! I hate to give up my old
    > clunker if I have to give up the quality I'm getting now.
    >
    > Your comments would be appreciated.
    >

    The only possible issues with the QCP-2700 would be its size (compared to
    the newer phones) and lack of features (compared to the newer phones).
    Beyond that, it's still a no-nonsense, well-built phone with very good call
    quality and very good signal reliability.

    Also, searches on Gigablast, Yahoo, and Google search engines for "QCP-2700
    battery" show multiple shopping sites that either sell genuine or compatible
    batteries for the Qualcomm/Kyocera QCP-2700 phones.

    If obtaining a new phone isn't an immediate priority, just getting another
    battery would seem like a good idea, and then the phone could continue to be
    used. A genuine battery is always preferred over a compatible battery, and
    of course, try to find the lowest possible price.





  3. #3
    rayindesmoines
    Guest

    Re: Phone Sound Quality Declining

    It's the 3G protocol. They are compressing the data more now and the
    quality is indeed lower. The 2700 was not a 3G phone, and uses more
    bandwidth.

    The price for progress!




  4. #4
    DTC
    Guest

    Re: Phone Sound Quality Declining

    >> What gives? I would think that with advances in technology that the
    >> newer phones would be better. Not so!


    Its a simple trade off between voice quality and making service affordable,
    i.e. loading as many user as possible on a channel.

    At one time, mobile service (the old IMTS) with 5 KHz deviation (channel
    bandwidth) was so clear, it would pass Touch-Tones, but...it only supported
    ONE person per channel. The entire Dallas & Fort Worth are had EIGHT
    channels and a 5 year waiting list to get a carphone and an hour wait to get
    a find an idle channel (unless you knew how to monitor the channel in Manual
    mode and slam the handset down the moment you heard the Idle tone and hit
    the Home or Roam mode button).

    Enter analog cellular with about 100 channels per cell (the other 600
    channels were used in the adjacent cells - quality was still good, just more
    Rayleigh flutter due to the shorter wavelength.

    Along comes TDMA which crams 24 conversations into one 5 KHz radio channel.
    First you bandwidth limit the analog audio to only 2,800 Hz or so (which is
    actually hardly noticeable), then you compress it down to only 200 Hz
    (roughly).

    Now when the digitized signal gets converted to back to analog, the
    quantitization errors make for crappy reproduction of voice (and THAT *IS*
    noticeable).

    Bottom line...you can get 24 times the revenue at the expense of voice
    quality. Of course Sprint uses CDMA, but the principle of compressing a
    signal and loosing quality (the Shannon Law) still applies.






  5. #5
    FirstHit
    Guest

    Re: Phone Sound Quality Declining


    Daniel W. Rouse Jr. wrote:

    > The only possible issues with the QCP-2700 would be its size (compared to
    > the newer phones) and lack of features (compared to the newer phones).
    > Beyond that, it's still a no-nonsense, well-built phone with very good call
    > quality and very good signal reliability.
    >
    > Also, searches on Gigablast, Yahoo, and Google search engines for "QCP-2700
    > battery" show multiple shopping sites that either sell genuine or compatible
    > batteries for the Qualcomm/Kyocera QCP-2700 phones.
    >
    > If obtaining a new phone isn't an immediate priority, just getting another
    > battery would seem like a good idea, and then the phone could continue to be
    > used. A genuine battery is always preferred over a compatible battery, and
    > of course, try to find the lowest possible price.


    Thanks for the good advice. I am not sure what I'll do, but I am
    leaning toward getting the new battery. I like the QCP-2700 and the
    sound quality is important to me. The size is comfortable for talking,
    but it's a little big for carrying around. Also, it would be nice to
    have a larger phone book. I agree, a genuine battery is the way to go!

    FirstHit




  6. #6
    FirstHit
    Guest

    Re: Phone Sound Quality Declining

    Thanks, Ray and DTC. It's good to know what's going on so I won't be
    pulling my hair out trying to find a phone that sounds like my
    Qualcomm.

    I find this crazy though that the cell companies "have to" cut us short
    in bandwidth on our calls at the same time they seem to be offering
    more and more features that consume plenty of bandwidth. Aren't they
    starting to transmit TV to mobile phones now? The way I see it, voice
    calls are what the phones are really for. The other stuff is just
    extra stuff.

    FirstHit




  7. #7
    Joel Kolstad
    Guest

    Re: Phone Sound Quality Declining

    "DTC" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]
    > Its a simple trade off between voice quality and making service affordable,
    > i.e. loading as many user as possible on a channel.


    At a certain level I agree and your post is quite informative, but I'd suggest
    that the overall profitability of Sprint is not necessarily as strong a
    function of "how many users can we squash into a channel?" as one might at
    first suspect. For instance, one ...reasonably... straightforward way of
    improving sound quality would be to dynamically change bandwidth usage
    depending on how 'busy' the cell site was. When you're the only one on it,
    everything sound as good if not better than a landline... when the thing is
    completely full, it drops back to the very low bit rate vocoders common today.
    On _average_, then, voice quality would improve... and (power controlled) CDMA
    is, after all, all about 'averages' in that, e.g., the average cell site
    capacity (phones scattered more or less randomly around the tower) is
    significantly greater than the worst case scenario (everyone standing on the
    fringes of the tower's coverage).

    A good example of a somewhat similar system that does this and its outcome is
    satellite radio in the USA. Sirius dynamically shifts bandwidth around from
    channel to channel depending on the instantaneous information content of all
    100+ signals they're cramming down a couple channel, whereas XM allocates
    bandwidth statically. The result has been that XM receivers are somewhat
    cheaper and were somewhat faster to be readily available on the market, where
    Sirius (purportedly) ends up with better-sounding audio... on average. :-)

    ---Joel Kolstad






  8. #8
    DTC
    Guest

    Re: Phone Sound Quality Declining

    > I find this crazy though that the cell companies "have to" cut us short
    > in bandwidth on our calls at the same time they seem to be offering
    > more and more features that consume plenty of bandwidth. Aren't they
    > starting to transmit TV to mobile phones now? The way I see it, voice
    > calls are what the phones are really for. The other stuff is just
    > extra stuff.


    That dove tails into what I posted once before. Not positive if it was the
    Cingular or AT&T website that had a short, maybe six questions, about what
    was importnat to you in a cellphone.

    Two questions ere, how important were changable covers and flip vs. non-flip
    phone.

    Nothing was asked like how important voice quality, not dropping calls, or
    battery life was.

    Not to sound cynical, but it is a trade off on making a profit. If a carrier
    offers a phone that targets, say under 24 year old crowd, and it outsells a
    phone with real functionality for a business person by hundred to
    one...guess what the new phones will be like.

    And I agree...why are carriers so concerend about tethering your phone to a
    laptop for internet access when there are pushing really bandwidth intensive
    apps like mobile TV. BTW, read an article in a trade magazine about mobile
    TV that sounded much like the fluff from the pre-intern boom crash,
    describing it as the next "gotta have" killer app.

    Cellular service, like low-end computers and the internet have become a
    commodity.





  9. #9

    Re: Phone Sound Quality Declining


    FirstHit wrote:
    > After seven years of using my Qualcomm QCP-2700 phone, I am going to
    > have to buy a new phone. My battery is dying.
    >
    > I have tried out a number of phones at the Sprint Store. From these
    > phones I call home and leave a message on my answering machine. While
    > I'm there, I also call from my present QCP-2700. In every case, I find
    > when I get home that my words are much clearer coming from my old 1998
    > phone.
    >
    > What gives? I would think that with advances in technology that the
    > newer phones would be better. Not so! I hate to give up my old
    > clunker if I have to give up the quality I'm getting now.
    >
    > Your comments would be appreciated.
    >
    > FirstHit


    Have you tried the LG PM 125 or 225? They have very good sound
    compared to many of today's phones.




  10. #10
    FirstHit
    Guest

    Re: Phone Sound Quality Declining


    [email protected] wrote:
    > FirstHit wrote:
    > > After seven years of using my Qualcomm QCP-2700 phone, I am going to
    > > have to buy a new phone. My battery is dying.
    > >
    > > I have tried out a number of phones at the Sprint Store. From these
    > > phones I call home and leave a message on my answering machine. While
    > > I'm there, I also call from my present QCP-2700. In every case, I find
    > > when I get home that my words are much clearer coming from my old 1998
    > > phone.
    > >
    > > What gives? I would think that with advances in technology that the
    > > newer phones would be better. Not so! I hate to give up my old
    > > clunker if I have to give up the quality I'm getting now.
    > >
    > > Your comments would be appreciated.
    > >
    > > FirstHit

    >
    > Have you tried the LG PM 125 or 225? They have very good sound
    > compared to many of today's phones.


    I did try the LG 125. It was better than the Samsungs. It competes
    well with today's phones, but with the 3rd-generation protocol, it
    doesn't have the clarity of my old Qualcomm.

    FirstHit




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